MOOCs at U Minn — “Educating for democracy: the power of presence” (Lars Christiansen and Michael Lansing)

Internet Connectivity

Internet Connectivity

This essay is reposted from MINNPOST with permission of the authors.

Educating for democracy: the power of presence

By Lars D. Christiansen and Michael J. Lansing | 07/24/13

This summer, in collaboration with the educational company Coursera, the University of Minnesota began offering Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs). The decision brought a national debate about the transformative effects of the Internet on colleges and universities to Minnesota. Other local schools are also exploring the possibilities of MOOCs. Meanwhile, faculty either wring their hands or join in as ongoing debates about the meaning and consequences of online-only education continue.

Those who boost for MOOCs promise more access to higher education with lowered costs. Yet they make assumptions about teaching that obscure the complicated ways in which people successfully learn. Rarely do these commentators attend to the power of presence in teaching and learning. These assumptions often lead to overstatements regarding the democratic potential of online-only education.

Lars Christiansen

Lars Christiansen

First, they assume that technology refers only to devices for online coursework. Too often, pundits conflate technology with the latest version of Internet-ready computers, pads, and smartphones. In fact, chalk and chalkboards, pencils and papers, dry erase markers, overhead projectors, cameras, slide machines and video projectors are also technologies. Teachers and learners used technologies long before medieval Europeans invented universities.

Second, observers usually argue that online education is novel. In fact, digital tools have been used by educators for over 40 years. Most college and university courses already depend on online instructional software such as D2L, Moodle, or Blackboard.

More than ‘sages on stages’

Third, pundits presume that more typical forms of education consist only of “sages on stages.” Yet colleges and universities offer learners much more than lectures. Most institutions provide more diverse experiences, including: discussions, internships, lab work, field work, archival research, literature reviews, group projects — and, of course, online discussion boards, wikis, blogs and web pages.

Fourth, MOOC boosters assume that education is about the thinking mind, not the feeling body. For the last 100 years, educational theorists have consistently rejected such dualistic thinking. Philosophers such as John Dewey and Mark Johnson insist that feelings and emotions — which emerge through sensory capabilities of the person in their surroundings — remain crucial to intellectual endeavor. Feeling and thinking are phases of an experience, not separate and distinct acts.

Left unchallenged, these assumptions lead those who advocate for online-only learning to argue that the format supplies the same learning experience as face-to-face settings. In their mind, online education delivers the same thing as existing forms of higher education, but makes them cheaper and more accessible.

Online education offers promise it can’t deliver

It doesn’t. Instead, an experience with far less potential is being offered to greater numbers of people, even as boosters present it as the same experience as the varied forms of education that already exist. Online education offers the promise of something it cannot deliver. It robs the very people that it claims to enrich. The rush to online learning also undermines and devalues educators who understand and deploy the vast opportunities for powerful learning that come from engaging the whole person.

Michael Lansing

Michael Lansing

After all, content is not an abstract thing that teachers merely communicate to students. Learning occurs through any number of distinct experiences. The qualities of every educational experience matter. By itself, online learning — involving sitting (or standing) at a computer, looking at a screen, scrolling with a mouse, and typing with a keyboard — offers a limited experience. When presented as a substitute for or alternative to direct experience and embodied presence, online learning insults rather than enriches.

In contrast, physical presence offers the gift of embodied interaction.  To be sure, some instructors succumb to giving boring lectures to students who remain uninspired, disconnected, and passive. Others, however, embrace a multitude of experiences to help students learn. They work hard to evaluate the educational value of every reading, lecture, site visit, guest lecture, film, puzzle, problem, research project, laboratory experiment, performance, or service and community-based project for learners.

Ignoring embodied experience: a major step backward

The power of presence must find a place in public debates about the merits of MOOCs. This requires educators to take seriously the sensory capabilities of students, as well as the role of feeling and emotion in learning. Teaching that ignores embodied human experience represents a major step backward in educational practice. It also reveals a staggering ignorance of educational philosophy and theory.

Minnesota’s colleges and universities should work to empower students in their quest for higher education by reducing tuition and debt instead of embracing disembodied online-only learning. Then they could increase access to an education that cultivates excitement about learning, develops a wide range of skills and competencies, and fosters empowered citizens committed to making a better society. All learners — irrespective of socio-economic circumstances — deserve nothing less.

Lars D. Christiansen is an associate professor and chair of sociology, Augsburg College.  Michael J. Lansing is an associate professor and chair of history, Augsburg College.

 

2 Comments on “MOOCs at U Minn — “Educating for democracy: the power of presence” (Lars Christiansen and Michael Lansing)”

  1. I posted this link on 1,2,3 Vote No on Facebook where the state of Idaho faces a chief school officer who promises access to educating “more students at a higher level with limited resources.”

    Thank you for writing.

  2. SteveinLongBeach says:

    Fowler Harper, Sterling Professor of Law at Yale until his death, once said: “Take the course for the professor, not for the content” – and this from the viewpoint of a school where content was, for lack of a better qualification, massive. At the very least, a ringing endorsement of the professor’s presence – specific, living, bodily, emotional, moral as well as intellectual presence. I would say that of the various educational experiences I’ve had, it’s the best teachers, and not just what they had to say – but _how_ they conveyed it – that remain with me more than the details. And I don’t see that MOOCs will replace that – though they may be good for certain purposes.


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